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First Aid Tips

Keep your trail horse healthy and safe, and learn some tricks to enjoying your next trail ride to the fullest.

Cuts and wounds are inevitably going to happen to your horse while you're out on the trail.

Horse Wound CareAre you prepared?

Download AQHA's FREE Horse Wound Care report so you will be able to properly treat your horse in the event of an injury.

Within this report you will find:

  • Components of a first-aid kit
  • How to care for a horse's wound
  • When to call the vet
  • How to prepare for the vet's visit
  • A five-step picture guide on how to properly bandage a minor leg wound
  • And more!

Educate yourself on when it is imperative that you contact the vet and when you can take care of the injury at home.

"Many of the cases that veterinarians deal with, and that I dealt with through my career through referral, are ones that were managed in most cases initially by the horse owners," says Dr. Ted Stashak, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University. "Unfortunately, because of lack of recognition of how serious an injury it was, it then became serious because if became infected."

Dr. Stashak wrote "Equine Wound Management," was the editor for "Adams' Lameness in Horses" and was the main author and editor for "The Horse Owner's Guide to Lameness."

Download the Horse Wound Care Report for FREE!

There are some areas on the horse that can appear to be minor injuries but can actually cause more damage than what can be seen on the exterior. These "danger zones" are highlighted for you in the FREE Horse Wound Care report so you won't make the mistake of classifying a more serious wound for a minor cut. Most of the danger zones lie over synovial structures that are at risk for infection when injured or damaged. These synovial structures are found mainly in the joints and are protective sheaths for tendons. If the wound starts discharging a yellowish fluid around one of these areas, it is most likely the synovial protective fluid and requires immediate care from a veterinarian.

Don't grab for that hydrogen peroxide and nitrofurazone product too quickly when it comes to your horse's wound first-aid. The Horse Wound Care report explains why these commonly used first-aid products might not be the best choice for your horse to heal the fastest. This report instead will tell you the best cleaning methods, including which cleaners to use, the dilutions to use them at and the correct cleaning procedures.

Do you know the ideal pressure to wash out a wound with? Did you know that you are supposed to wash out the wound at an angle? The Horse Wound Care report will make you a more prepared horse owner by explaining these tips and much more for you next horse injury.

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