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Filly Sells for $1M at Heritage Sale

A Dash Of Sweet Heat sets record of $1 million

stallionesearch.com
November 2, 2012

a dash of sweet heat

The 2-year-old A Dash Of Sweet Heat sold on November 1 for $1 million at the Heritage Place Fall Mixed Sale in Oklahoma City, the highest price ever brought at the facility. Heritage's previous auction record was established at the Heritage Place Winter Mixed Sale on January 14, 2010, when broodmare Dashin Follies brought at a final bid of $875,000.

A Dash Of Sweet Heat is the second-highest Quarter Horse of racing age sold at auction. Queen For Cash, the 1981 champion 3-year-old filly, sold in 1982 for $1.1 million.

Julianna Hawn Holt of San Antonio, Texas, purchased A Dash Of Sweet Heat from the VSE Consignment on behalf of the Department of Treasury. She also bred the filly, who is by Mr Jess Perry and out of all-time leading dam Corona Chick, and sold her as the high-selling yearling at the 2011 Ruidoso Select Yearling Sale for $650,000.

A Dash Of Sweet Heat was raced once, in a May 25 trial to the Ruidoso Futurity (G1), in which she crossed the wire fourth but was moved to third. She is the second-to-last foal produced from Corona Chick, the now-pensioned dam of earners of more than $3.6 million.

The top three seller's during the three-day sale's opening session, all from the VSE on behalf of the Department of Treasure consignment, helped boost the 2012 opening day average to nearly double last year. Preliminary sale numbers reported 268 head of 298 offered sold for a gross of $4,785,399. The first day average totaled $17,856 and saw a median price of $6,200.

Eddie Willis purchased the second high-seller, FG Perry Cartel, a Mr Jess Perry yearling out of Libbys Cartel, by Corona Cartel, for $105,000. R.D. Hubbard paid $100,000 for an unnamed Corona Cartel yearling out of the Strawfly Special mare Act Up.

Holt was the first day leading buyer with the one purchase for $1 million, followed by Charles E. Robison who had four purchases for $230,000 and Johnny Trotter/Burnett Ranches who bought three head for $190,000.

VSE on behalf of the Department of the Treasury was the leading consignor on the first day with 103 head for $3,534,499. JEH Stallion Station, Agent sold six for $114,300 and Grant Farms, LLC had three for $97,000.

First Down Dash was the leading sale sire by average on day one with 15 head for $103,000. Mr Jess Perry had 35 head average $100,800 and Corona Cartel had 22 head average $89,727.

More than 300 horses that the U.S. government says were purchased as part of a Mexican drug cartel’s money-laundering operation were put up for auction starting Thursday in Oklahoma City.

Government officials are hoping to earn several million dollars from the three-day sale. They acknowledged that seizing horses through forfeiture is somewhat unusual, according to Mike Lemoine, a spokesman for the Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigation Division.

“Generally, on something that lives and breathes, we’re pretty cautious,” Lemoine said. “But the defendants agreed to this sale, which eliminates most of the risk for potential buyers.”

According to Federal prosecutors, 15 people charged in the case funneled millions of dollars in drug profits through quarter horse operations. Most of the horses that were seized came from a ranch near Lexington, Oklahoma that prosecutors say was run by Jose Trevino Morales, the brother of two alleged leaders of the Zeta drug cartel in Mexico.

Morales’ attorney and family maintain he’s innocent and being unfairly linked to his brothers, who were among those named in the federal indictment and are fugitives believed to be in Mexico.

Although many of the horses had names like Big Daddy Cartel and Coronita Cartel, those names refer to the horse’s lineage as a descendant of noted sire Corona Cartel and not the alleged activities of its previous owners, said Debbie Schauf, the executive director of the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Racing Association.

“That’s just a fluke coincidence,” Schauf said. “Any offspring of his has ‘cartel’ in the name because they want to show the blood line.”

For Day 1 Heritage Place Fall Mixed preliminary sales results, including hip-by-hip prices, CLICK HERE.